April 2018 Health Newsletter

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» Chiropractic Cuts Blood Pressure
» Study Findings Show Spinal Manipulation Therapy Effective in Treating Lower Back
» Listening to Your Body – When do You Need a Break?
» Over 40 and Lift Weights? Eat More Protein

Chiropractic Cuts Blood Pressure

Chiropractic Cuts Blood Pressure

March 16, 2007 -- A special chiropractic adjustment can significantly lower high blood pressure, a placebo-controlled study suggests.

"This procedure has the effect of not one, but two blood-pressure medications given in combination," study leader George Bakris, MD, tells WebMD. "And it seems to be adverse-event free. We saw no side effects and no problems," adds Bakris, director of the University of Chicago hypertension center.

Eight weeks after undergoing the procedure, 25 patients with early-stage high blood pressure had significantly lower blood pressure than 25 similar patients who underwent a sham chiropractic adjustment. Because patients can't feel the technique, they were unable to tell which group they were in.

X-rays showed that the procedure realigned the Atlas vertebra -- the doughnut-like bone at the very top of the spine -- with the spine in the treated patients, but not in the sham-treated patients.

Compared to the sham-treated patients, those who got the real procedure saw an average 14 mm Hg greater drop in systolic blood pressure (the top number in a blood pressure count), and an average 8 mm Hg greater drop in diastolic blood pressure (the bottom blood pressure number).

None of the patients took blood pressure medicine during the eight-week study.

"When the statistician brought me the data, I actually didn't believe it. It was way too good to be true," Bakris says. "The statistician said, 'I don't even believe it.' But we checked for everything, and there it was."

Bakris and colleagues report their findings in the advance online issue of the Journal of Human Hypertension.

Atlas Adjustment and Hypertension

The procedure calls for adjustment of the C-1 vertebra. It's called the Atlas vertebra because it holds up the head, just as the titan Atlas holds up the world in Greek mythology.

Marshall Dickholtz Sr., DC, of the Chiropractic Health Center, in Chicago, is the 84-year-old chiropractor who performed all the procedures in the study. He calls the Atlas vertebra "the fuse box to the body."

"At the base of the brain are two centers that control all the muscles of the body. If you pinch the base of the brain -- if the Atlas gets locked in a position as little as a half a millimeter out of line -- it doesn't cause any pain but it upsets these centers," Dickholtz tells WebMD.

The subtle adjustment is practiced by the very small subgroup of chiropractors certified in National Upper Cervical Chiropractic (NUCCA) techniques. The procedure employs precise measurements to determine a patient's Atlas vertebra alignment. If realignment is deemed necessary, the chiropractor uses his or her hands to gently manipulate the vertebra.

"We are not doctors. We are spinal engineers," Dickholtz says. "We use mathematics, geometry, and physics to learn how to slide everything back into place."

What does this have to do with high blood pressure pressure?

Bakris notes that some researchers have suggested that injury to the Atlas vertebra can affect blood flow in the arteries at the base of the skull. Dickholtz thinks the misaligned Atlas triggers release of signals that make the arteries contract. Whether the procedure actually fixes such injuries is unknown, Bakris says.

Bakris began the study after a fellow doctor told him that something strange was happening in his family practice. The doctor had been sending some of his patients to a chiropractor. Some of these patients had high blood pressure. 

Yet after seeing the chiropractor, the patients' blood pressure had normalized -- and a few of them were able to stop taking their blood pressure medications.

So Bakris, then at Rush University, designed the pilot study with 50 patients. He's now organizing a much bigger clinical trial.

"Is it going to be for everybody with high blood pressure? No," Bakris says. "We clearly need to identify those who can benefit. It is pretty clear that some kind of head or neck trauma early in life is related to this. This is really a work in progress. It is certainly in the early stages of research."

Dickholtz has been teaching, practicing, and studying the NUCCA technique for 50 years. He says high blood pressure is far from the only thing an Atlas misalignment causes.

"On the other hand, if people have high blood pressure, there is a tremendous possibility they need an Atlas adjustment," he says.

 

 

Author: www.WebMD.com Health News by Daniel J. DeNoon
Source: Rush University Hypertension Center Chicago IL
Copyright: Journal Of Human Hypertension 3


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Study Findings Show Spinal Manipulation Therapy Effective in Treating Lower Back

The Spine Journal (2018) has just published a study that points to spinal manipulation therapy being the most effective way to treat lower back pain when compared with other methods. The effectiveness and safety of some different mobilization and manipulation therapies were examined. It was concluded definitively that spinal manipulation produces a much more significant effect on the lower back than a mobilization option. Spinal manipulation therapy can be applied appropriately by a Doctor of Chiropractic. Key findings were:

  • 57 percent of patients that took part in the study experienced effective relief of chronic pain occurring in the lower back. 78 percent of the same patients also experienced a reduction in disability. This happened when spinal manipulation therapy was compared to other treatments.
  • When comparing spinal manipulation to the use of physical therapy, 79 percent of these patients reported that spinal manipulation was most effective at relieving symptoms of both pain and disability.
  • It is worth noting here that both mobilization and manipulation therapies tested in this study are considered safe to use as treatments. 

Back pain is more common than you think. In the U.S. alone, 84 percent of the population suffers from some sort of back pain. Within this percentage, roughly 23 percent experience back pain that is chronic, and half again are actually disabled by this severe pain. What are you waiting for? Contact your local chiropractor today and start working with them to find relief from your chronic back pain.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Manip. & Mob…Chronic LBP: A Systematic Review & Meta-Analysis. The Spine Journal
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2018


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Listening to Your Body – When do You Need a Break?

There is such a thing as too much of a good thing. You might see exercise as a great addition to your lifestyle, but you need breaks from your training, too.  Noam Tamir of TS Fitness New York City explains that your body goes through trauma when you exercise.  So how do you know when to take a break?

  • You're constantly sore: delayed onset muscle soreness, or DOMS, is normal. However, you shouldn't feel this all the time. Allow 24-48 hours in between each workout session.
  • You're always tired: moodiness and tiredness are signs of working out too much. This is because cortisol is produced by exercise. Too much of this can take a toll on your mental health.
  • You have an abnormal heart rate: check your heart rate regularly. If your resting heart rate is higher than average, then it's not ready for your next workout session yet.
  • You're always stiff: if you continue to be stiff long after a workout, your body is going to start changing the way it moves naturally. This can become permanent and potentially cause injury.
  • You've got dark yellow pee: looking at the color of your pee is the easiest way to figure out if you're dehydrated or not. The darker your pee, the more water you need to drink. 

Growing Attuned to Your Body for Optimum Health
Because you actually create micro-tears in your muscles when you exercise, they need time to repair, which will help them grow stronger.  The more you exercise, the more you strain your body. If you're not giving your body the breaks it needs, you could be doing more harm than good.  Take a day of rest between workouts and you’ll be stronger, fitter, and happier than ever!

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: https://www.cnn.com/2015/12/15/health/take-rest-day-exercise/index.html
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2018


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Over 40 and Lift Weights? Eat More Protein
The British Journal of Sports Medicine has published a review that definitively points to protein as the building block of more muscle. According to this comprehensive review, people who want to be physically stronger should lift weights and eat more protein. This is especially true for people who are over 40. However, there is a caution in the review, explaining that there is a limit to the benefits that protein has. Through the review, they concluded that any protein works on a similar level of effectiveness. By studying 49 past experiments that reviewed different types of protein in both men's and women's diet correlating with their weightlifting, they concluded that protein plays a big part in building muscle. It was found that men and women who ate protein while weight training developed muscles that were larger and stronger. The statistical results were as follows: 10 percent for strength and 25 percent for muscle mass. The researchers also calculated precisely how much protein intake was needed on a daily basis to achieve these results. The answer was 1.6 grams of protein per kilogram that you weigh. Beyond this specific measurement, more protein did not equal more muscle. However, it is worth noting that this number required for daily protein intake is considerably higher than the regular federal recommendations of 56 grams a day for men and 46 grams for women. While there are still more studies to be done on the correlation between weightlifting and protein intake, it's safe to say that eating a balanced diet including protein will help you gain muscle.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Br J Sports Med. 2018 Mar;52(6):376-384.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2018


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