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» Chiropractic Cuts Blood Pressure
» Did You Know Your Tension-Type Headache Might Originate in Your Back?
» Too Much Food Variety in Your Diet Can Lead to Unhealthy Eating

Chiropractic Cuts Blood Pressure

Chiropractic Cuts Blood Pressure

March 16, 2007 -- A special chiropractic adjustment can significantly lower high blood pressure, a placebo-controlled study suggests.

"This procedure has the effect of not one, but two blood-pressure medications given in combination," study leader George Bakris, MD, tells WebMD. "And it seems to be adverse-event free. We saw no side effects and no problems," adds Bakris, director of the University of Chicago hypertension center.

Eight weeks after undergoing the procedure, 25 patients with early-stage high blood pressure had significantly lower blood pressure than 25 similar patients who underwent a sham chiropractic adjustment. Because patients can't feel the technique, they were unable to tell which group they were in.

X-rays showed that the procedure realigned the Atlas vertebra -- the doughnut-like bone at the very top of the spine -- with the spine in the treated patients, but not in the sham-treated patients.

Compared to the sham-treated patients, those who got the real procedure saw an average 14 mm Hg greater drop in systolic blood pressure (the top number in a blood pressure count), and an average 8 mm Hg greater drop in diastolic blood pressure (the bottom blood pressure number).

None of the patients took blood pressure medicine during the eight-week study.

"When the statistician brought me the data, I actually didn't believe it. It was way too good to be true," Bakris says. "The statistician said, 'I don't even believe it.' But we checked for everything, and there it was."

Bakris and colleagues report their findings in the advance online issue of the Journal of Human Hypertension.

Atlas Adjustment and Hypertension

The procedure calls for adjustment of the C-1 vertebra. It's called the Atlas vertebra because it holds up the head, just as the titan Atlas holds up the world in Greek mythology.

Marshall Dickholtz Sr., DC, of the Chiropractic Health Center, in Chicago, is the 84-year-old chiropractor who performed all the procedures in the study. He calls the Atlas vertebra "the fuse box to the body."

"At the base of the brain are two centers that control all the muscles of the body. If you pinch the base of the brain -- if the Atlas gets locked in a position as little as a half a millimeter out of line -- it doesn't cause any pain but it upsets these centers," Dickholtz tells WebMD.

The subtle adjustment is practiced by the very small subgroup of chiropractors certified in National Upper Cervical Chiropractic (NUCCA) techniques. The procedure employs precise measurements to determine a patient's Atlas vertebra alignment. If realignment is deemed necessary, the chiropractor uses his or her hands to gently manipulate the vertebra.

"We are not doctors. We are spinal engineers," Dickholtz says. "We use mathematics, geometry, and physics to learn how to slide everything back into place."

What does this have to do with high blood pressure pressure?

Bakris notes that some researchers have suggested that injury to the Atlas vertebra can affect blood flow in the arteries at the base of the skull. Dickholtz thinks the misaligned Atlas triggers release of signals that make the arteries contract. Whether the procedure actually fixes such injuries is unknown, Bakris says.

Bakris began the study after a fellow doctor told him that something strange was happening in his family practice. The doctor had been sending some of his patients to a chiropractor. Some of these patients had high blood pressure. 

Yet after seeing the chiropractor, the patients' blood pressure had normalized -- and a few of them were able to stop taking their blood pressure medications.

So Bakris, then at Rush University, designed the pilot study with 50 patients. He's now organizing a much bigger clinical trial.

"Is it going to be for everybody with high blood pressure? No," Bakris says. "We clearly need to identify those who can benefit. It is pretty clear that some kind of head or neck trauma early in life is related to this. This is really a work in progress. It is certainly in the early stages of research."

Dickholtz has been teaching, practicing, and studying the NUCCA technique for 50 years. He says high blood pressure is far from the only thing an Atlas misalignment causes.

"On the other hand, if people have high blood pressure, there is a tremendous possibility they need an Atlas adjustment," he says.

 

 

Author: www.WebMD.com Health News by Daniel J. DeNoon
Source: Rush University Hypertension Center Chicago IL
Copyright: Journal Of Human Hypertension 3


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Did You Know Your Tension-Type Headache Might Originate in Your Back?

If you are an office worker, you might find yourself prone to tension-type headaches. These tension headaches can be dull, or throbbing, and make it hard for you to concentrate on your work. But why do you get them? Did you ever consider just how these headaches happen? Is it just general “stress”? Or is it something more?

The Relationship Between Tension Headaches and Your Back
It turns out that tension-type headaches may actually have something to do with the muscles in our back. Specifically, one study found that tenderness in the trapezius muscles was correlated with tension-type headaches in female office workers. (We can assume that this is similar for male office workers, as well.) If you look at a picture of the trapezius muscles, this connection makes a lot more sense. The trapezius muscles, or “traps” for short, are muscles that lay along the spine at the top part of the back. They fan out like diamonds, stretching up into your neck and down into the midsection of the back. Spending a lot of time hunched over a desk or peering into a computer most likely puts stress on these muscles as the head is tilted forward too much in what is called “forward head posture.” These muscles connect to the muscles of the head and face, encouraging stress and pain.

Chiropractic Care for Tension-Type Headache
Fortunately, we have a way to safely treat these headaches through expert chiropractic care. Contact us today for a consultation!

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: JMPT. July–Aug, 2018. Vol 41, Issue 6, Pages 483–487.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2018


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Too Much Food Variety in Your Diet Can Lead to Unhealthy Eating

The American Heart Association (AHA) is now questioning the assumption that eating a diverse array of foods is good for your health. This has been a diet recommendation for years, but doctors and nutritionists don’t agree on what an "array" or "variety" of food means. In fact, including a wide variety of food in your diet may actually be unhealthy. According to new studies, diversity in food choices is tied to poor diet, including eating refined sugars and grains, processed food, and sugar-laden drinks. Doctors once recommended getting a variety of food in your diet because it helps you get all the vitamins and nutrients you need. However, with the rise of cheap junk food and its availability, people are confusing variety with quality. The AHA Behavioral Change for Improving Health Factors Committee reviewed fairly recent studies on the topic of food variety in the diet, including its impact on obesity and eating patterns. Overall, they came to the conclusion that diversity in the diet doesn't necessarily connect to healthy habits. In fact, they discovered evidence suggesting that eating a wider variety of foods is tied to eating more food in general, poor eating habits, and gaining weight. Instead, researchers promote eating a large variety of healthy foods, including whole grains, veggies, and fruits.

Author: ChiroPlanet.com
Source: Circulation, online August 9, 2018.
Copyright: ProfessionalPlanets.com LLC 2018


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